Why are there So Few Football Referees in the UK?

Why are there So Few Football Referees in the UK?


It is
a six-figure job, with plenty of travel, free
tickets for the family and a world-class support network. Frankly, it is almost as good as
being a footballer, but English football’s attitude to those who oversee 850,000 games
a year is damaging the refereeing profession. At the depths of the pyramid, well away from
the Premier League and where most of the 31,735 Football Association-affiliated officials
do their whistling, it is a very different experience. According to the FA’s own figures, the game
lost nearly 6,700 referees last year. That was an improvement on the year before, when
nearly one in four referees quit. The good news is that English football is
replacing referees as quickly as it is loses them. The bad news is that four out of five
of these replacements are under 18, have done the training course as part of a PE qualification
or for their Duke of Edinburgh award, and will quit within two years. The explanation for why can be found on the
touchlines of far too many amateur and youth games every weekend, can be heard on radio
phone-ins, and can be seen on TV and social media. The former head of the Professional Game Match
Officials Limited, Keith Hackett, presided over hundreds of games in a career that started
when he was 16 in Sheffield’s local leagues and finished just short of his 50th birthday
in the Premier League. “There is a different intensity in amateur
and youth football to when I took up the whistle,” the 75-year-old Yorkshireman told The Athletic.
“The games are more competitive, more aggressive and more difficult to control. A lot of the
problems come from parents. It’s incredible how much abuse referees receive from the sidelines. “I don’t think the Match of the Day pundits
realise the influence they have. I did some big matches and made mistakes. But I don’t
remember living with the amount of scrutiny that today’s referees face. “And these inexperienced refs are held to
the same standards as the guys at the top of the pyramid — that can’t be fair. “I never felt frightened when I was a young
ref. I wasn’t intimated, I was welcomed. But the young refs now need a degree of resilience
that wasn’t necessary 40 or 50 years ago.” Martin Cassidy refereed in the Football League
until an injury ended his hopes of reaching the top-flight in 2006. He then spent seven
years as a referee coach for the FA before setting up Ref Support in 2016. Now a charity, Ref Support is an independent
voice for officials in the United Kingdom and Cassidy, as its chief executive, thinks
he knows why so many quit. “Some go because they’re too old, some
will go because they’re fed up of the abuse and some will go because they can earn more
money for less effort by officiating in unaffiliated five- and six-a-side leagues,” he says. But Cassidy also believes the authorities
are failing to protect officials by being too soft on violent players, a situation compounded
by local police forces’ reluctance to get involved. “If Martin Atkinson makes a mistake in a
game in London, is unlikely to get any grief the following day at home in Yorkshire,”
says Cassidy. “But if you make a mistake on Hackney Marshes,
you might see those players in the supermarket. Your kids might get a mouthful of abuse or
worse because their dad got somebody a three-game ban. “I know of a referee whose son plays in
the Premier League. He was assaulted during a game — a player tried to bite his nose
— and he wanted to report it but his son persuaded him not to because that team drank
in the local pubs. “Everyone who has played amateur football
knows there is a bad team in every league, the one that causes all the trouble. But there
is still no robust system for dealing with these things.” Having introduced its Respect campaign to
improve behaviour in 2008, the FA is keen to point out that only 0.01 per cent of those
850,000 games include an incident of assault. But Cassidy says that is still two a week
— “two-a-week too many” — and wonders how many incidents are unproven or unreported.
Even Field, whose organisation tends to be less critical of the FA and county FAs, thinks
the real figure is much higher. For Cassidy, Field and Hackett, the answer
is much tougher sanctions. The recommended sanction for making physical
contact with an official is a six-month ban. This could be pushing the referee or snatching
their cards away. For actually striking an official, the ban can be five years or even
life. While the FA has tried to make sanctions more
consistent across the 50 county FAs with centrally appointed disciplinary panels, they all wonder
why more indefinite bans, known as ‘sine die’ suspensions, are not being dished out. Ref Support has also lobbied hard to allow
officials to wear body cameras but the idea has been ruled out by the game’s law-making
body the International Football Association Board, of which the four British home nations
are permanent members. The FA believe there would be child protection
and data privacy issues if referees use body cams. Cassidy dismisses this and said he is
consulting lawyers over a possible challenge to the IFAB ruling at the Court of Arbitration
for Sport. “Refereeing can be brilliant but it can
also be better,” he adds. On this point, Field agrees but his answers
to the problems are slightly different. First, as the FA’s numbers would suggest,
recruitment is not the issue. In fact, there are waiting lists for training courses as
there are only 500 tutors in the country. Field would use some of the £35 million county
FAs have sitting in their bank accounts as “rainy day money” to double the tutor
pool. “There are people queuing up to give us
money — let’s make that easier,” he joked. But he also wants to give new referees
a lot more for their tuition fees, which range from free to £180 depending on which county
you try and how badly they need referees at that particular moment. He believes fewer referees would quit if the
training was better and there were more opportunities for continuous personal development. At present,
only referees who want to progress beyond level five on the pyramid — senior county
referees — have to refresh their knowledge or prove their fitness. More money for training would also make it
more likely that good, young, active referees, who tend to be trying to climb up the ladder,
would be willing to act as mentors, observers and tutors. Field wants the FA to do more for its officials.
He points out that the FA’s refereeing budget is about £1.8 million a year, less than it
pays England manager Gareth Southgate. “If you want a headline”, said Field,
“you could say the chairman of the RA thinks the FA should double the budget,” This year, he has also been working hard with
the Home Office and Sports Minister Nigel Adams to persuade the courts to “realise
an assault on a referee is not just a football matter”. Field wants the sentencing guidelines
changed so attacking a referee is treated in the same way as an assault on a police
community support officer or traffic warden. But he is less convinced by the latest iteration
of the FA’s Respect initiative: putting officials under the age of 18 in purple shirts
or yellow socks to highlight the fact they are children. “Isn’t it sad that it’s come to this?”
he asks. For him, any adult who abuses a young official
should be sent on a safeguarding course and if they come from a club with FA charter status,
the club should be in trouble, too. Field believes clubs with poor disciplinary records
should not receive grants from the football authorities. Cassidy is another who sees the purple-shirt
idea as well-intentioned but fundamentally depressing. “What does the purple shirt idea say about
how we treat referees? “he asks. “Can you imagine having to point out to people
that this person is a child in any other walk of life?” He is also fed up with those who abuse officials
on social media. “We’ve seen guys with senior roles at
clubs saying such and such ref ‘needs shooting’ or is an ‘effing cheat,’” he says. “I
am a big believer that the abuse of referees evolves in the same way that crime does and
if you don’t nip it in the bud you are asking for trouble later on.” But despite the annual churn, the scorn from
the sidelines, blockages in the pyramid, Twitter trolls and VAR controversies, Cassidy, Hackett,
and Field agree on one thing. “It is a fantastic career,” said Field. “I often say to young referees that somebody
has to take charge of the 2039 FA Cup Final — it could be you.”

100 comments on this post

    Alfie Ryan

    Is the abuse actually getting worse or are there just more sensitive people these days?

    Reply

    Night Fury

    Referees need bodycams. It would help stop so many problems before they even start.

    America has the UK completely beat with the referee system. Shockingly enough we actually do something about physical abuse, more than likely the coach will be banned from the complex if not kicked out of the club BY THE CLUB. Verbal abuse is also taken very seriously. Parents are basically out of everyone's control as we can't punish them for speaking however we as referees can abandon the match. Unfortunately, that also punishes the team's playing.

    Every referee aside from those who referee for PRO also wears the same uniform and grade isn't shown on badges only the year. Unfortunately, we have many terrible referees who don't do enough during the match but rarely do we lose referees because of parents or coaches or players. Most of the youth referees are players themselves and many of the youth matches are refereed by referees under the age of 18.

    If you read all of this congratulations, you now know a goalkeeper and referee's insight into the US Soccer Referee Program. Sorry for the long-winded comment.

    Reply

    Torr Vi

    You know refs are fuck, when they have a Ref Support Charity 😂

    Reply

    Cowboy 93

    I was a referee when I was 16 and ended up sending off the away coach after 10 minutes in my first game😂

    Reply

    Will Blanthorne

    My brother got terribly abused and harrased at his first game at 16 at u7s its not even competitive at that age theres no league liverpool is an awful league

    Reply

    E_M_E_T

    the world is going to end in 2038 so there actually won't be a 2039 fa cup final

    Reply

    Miguel Appleton

    Historians have recently discovered that life on Earth didn't really start in the oceans, but actually originally appeared in the Athletic

    Reply

    Marco Zerbinati

    In italy, it's the same or eaven worse. Refs are not supported

    Reply

    Dan Preston

    I was a ref for the early part of this century, before a car accident left me unable to run. Here’s my two penneth. Reffing at local level is shit. Doing kids football is ok, and I used to have an easy way to shut the loud mouthed parents and coaches up, I just embarrassed them. 'You’re really saying that in front of your child and their mates?, grow up' kind of thing. Adult local football was horrible. Sunday morning adult football even worse. You feel so isolated as one person against everyone else, the team, their coaches, their fans. I stopped doing that within about 3 years. The best thing we had was the local league team's youth academy, which at that time was part of the premier league academy. Up to the U15 teams you could referee the games and at U16 you could run the line. We used it as a kind of mentoring system for new and young refs, in a controlled and supportive environment. We would even share games, doing a half each and spending the other half evaluating each other's performance. Plus we got to watch the best young players from Chelsea, Arsenal and so on and also get to watch and listen to the best youth coaches, which was an amazing experience. Also, the youth team players are so well behaved so it was always enjoyable to ref the matches.
    For me there is a problem in how fast refs can progress. If you are reffing when a teenager you haven’t played enough of the game to have a good enough understanding, but if you wait until you are 30, which I did, you are too old to take the career anywhere.

    Reply

    Town159

    Essay here:
    I started at 14 back in 2011, I remember my first “big appointment” for a junior official, a county cup match (U11’s). I was so happy to be involved but ended up having the parents of the away team giving me death threats as the lost after extra time. Parents found out where I lived and were shouting it to each other “to organise a lynching.” I ended up being shielded by the home team for over an hour. I kept going and got pretty far, but quit 2 years ago as the abuse every game was unreal, the last match I did ended up being cornered by a few player who threatened to rape me for it.
    And the punishment both incidents got? A written reminder of the expected behaviours of the game. I have zero faith in the FA as the really don’t seem to care.

    Reply

    Evan Geissler

    I’m happy our community/rec league has been supporting the refs for many years by:

    1) Not tolerating any abuse towards refs from parents and coaches. (We crack down on them if it’s towards the ref or not. No room for that type of behaviour)
    2) Let the referees caution and send off coaches and also let them kick parents out.
    3) Pay them them well enough above minimum wage so the appeal is better.
    4) Offer as much mentoring and training support as possible.

    So many sports here (I’m from Canada) have so much abuse for their refs and who could blame a kid for not wanting that.

    Reply

    DHIATENSOR

    In our defense, the referee is a wanker.

    Reply

    RT-Soldier14

    Before I watch the video I must comment:
    It's not just in the UK, in Malta this is also a problem and they (The MFA) import foreign refs.

    Reply

    Tyler Chase

    Tifo.. I love this video I can speech from experience as I started reffing when I was 15 in Northern California which is a big hub for refs in the United States. Many of the refs that end up being national refs or even fifa refs comes from Nor Cal, but even here people are so hostile and expect us to be perfect which is not the case. Anyways love the channel and love the video!

    Reply

    Danny C

    As a Ref myself, I think the saddest thing is how I and everyone else just has to accept the abuse as part of the job. The thing I've learned to think about is whether their criticism is valid. If it is, then there is something I can build on and get better with, and if it isn't, I can disregard it. The abuse they shout is not only out of place, its also often misguided and incorrect.

    Reply

    igorcurumim

    talk about the libertadores final

    Reply

    J G

    I'll never get over how middle aged men feel like they can abuse whoever they want whenever they want. You see it with the racist abuse players are still recieving at the top levels of the game in England.

    Reply

    Eric Mugerwa

    It’s a 6 figure job??? Why didn’t they say so!!! Lmao

    Reply

    Michael Scott

    I reffed for a bit. In a U10s pre season game I had an incident occur where by the letter of the Law I should have issued a Red Card. Instead I had a word with the Kid's coach and asked him to sub him off instead so there would be no cards, fines or suspension. The Kid's Dad said he'd be waiting in the car park for me afterwards. At Sunday League level lad culture is just ruining the game. For what is essentially organised recreational football the behaviour of many players is just toxic.

    Reply

    Jakub Widlarz

    The FA is, was and always will be a glorified banana republic.

    Reply

    George Barty

    This guy has the best voice on YouTube.

    Reply

    Davey Ryuzaki

    Nigel Adams won’t do shit. He can’t stop the football hooligans in central Yorkshire, and he has no clout whatsoever.

    Reply

    ICULookin

    All team sports have this huge problem: parents live vicariously through their children and think they can boss about the refs and coordinators. Entitlement through the roof.

    Reply

    SueMyChin

    The biggest problem is that 2/3 referees aren't up to what is an incredibly difficult job and frustration with this is inevitable.

    I stopped playing football 2 years ago after a bad tackle done my knee ligaments and I had to miss 3 months of work. The game was clearly getting out of hand, the referee did nothing to stop it, some lad 2 footed me and that was that. The referee yellow carded him! I was so angry that if I was able to stand I'd have snapped the lads leg then the referee's neck. I had to stop playing the sport I've loved as a result.

    My point is, the lack of training and selection makes some referees so bad to be dangerous and if you're asking/expecting people not to lose their temper when someone is endangering both thier's and their children's health you're being naive. I can live with bad decisions, it's just a game but they must be stronger and show authority at all levels.

    Reply

    José David Castro

    The Mr Robot Evil Corp reference was dope… and originally appeared on The Athletic

    Reply

    Jack Tee

    People need to start understanding that sunday league football is irrelevant- it’s supposed to be a bit of fun for kids, or a bit of exercise. instead Parents and Coaches often can be seen screaming at young kids playing and reffing. There is a baffling level of seriousness among ‘supporters’ for what frankly is a shit standard of football that has no real significance

    Reply

    Lukebr0503

    As a player for many years at youth level now I see how much hassle referees get from our opponents as we were always brought up as a squad to respect the officials and be polite to them and not once was anything ever reported when a referee was assaulted or had other issues during a game through fear the FA is shocking at handling situations like that and just hide away using stats that arnt actually true

    Reply

    Sam Brockelsby

    I've been playing senior level amateur or Sunday league football for the last 10 or so years, and I can't for the life of me understand why anyone would choose to be a referee. I'm extremely grateful that some do, but the amount of abuse they get on a regular basis is unbelievable.

    Reply

    Jason Sender

    All i know is that the ones we do have are wank

    Reply

    Finlay Craig

    Because there are too many moron neanderthals in this country

    Reply

    Tom Powell

    Mike Dean

    Reply

    AE 13

    Because of horrible parents and arm chair refs who think they know better because they watched the replay in slow motion a couple of times.

    Reply

    Andrew Rodgers

    I just tune out the background noise when I'm refereeing. It becomes just a constant wall of noise after a while.

    Reply

    Anon

    Can't wait until there are no refs left to command the game, that'll shut up the red faced gammon pricks in the sidelines. If you actually want to play football like a civilized human, go to the continent.

    Reply

    Lord Fawkes Von Proudhon

    The masterbation rates are falling?

    Reply

    rising raisings

    Where did the athletic originally appear on?

    Reply

    mikael feathers

    Serious question, how does it feel to sell out ?

    Reply

    Thun Dara

    Immigrants will take the referee jobs without complaining. Insults and threats mean nothing to people who have nothing left to lose. They will rush the jobs, simple. Sad but true.

    Reply

    Gaurav Rawat

    Hey tiffo plz Make a video on journey of sunil chhetri hero of indian football

    Reply

    SANG

    sometimes the ref deserves it. only if they're actually adults though. deano is a prime example of a ref who needs shooting

    Reply

    mookkss

    In the Netherlands we have the same kind of problem. Here they dont even make a 6 figure salary and most of them have jobs on the side. And the amount of times a referee has been killed or put in the hospital is disgraceful. All of them on amateur level.

    Reply

    Edmund Bloxam

    I have been a referee for many years. I think a number of things have been exaggerated here. I referee at the very bottom level, and, the vast majority of the time, the players get on with the game. There is virtually no touchline abuse (because there are virtually no people at the touchlines). I've been an assistant referee at a proper ground, and the fans there were…acceptable.

    You do get abuse and you do need a thick skin. But most of the time the players will get annoyed, say 'that was shit, ref' and walk away. (My rule of thumb is I only send a player off if they direct insults directly at me, ie. 'You are shit, ref'.

    Mostly I want to stick up for support from the league. I've had a couple of really rough games. I reported it to the relevant FAs (Gloucestershire and Cambridgeshire, as I moved), and the team was called up into a very official meeting, and suitably chastised. I want to applaud the associations for how much effort they put into looking after the ref. Most of the time I wasn't that bothered, but the FA insisted on following it up. I even had a 'problem team', so I was nervous going into a game after having called them up in front of a disciplinary board. To the team's/players' credit, they were good as gold and treated me well.

    I experienced one moment of violence, and this was, dramatically, having a ball kicked at me (multiple times). In six years, this was literally the only time I experienced anything violent. Again, I wasn't that bothered. But, after reporting it to the FA, I received a call from the local police force asking if I wanted to file charges for physical abuse. That is to say, the FA insisted on contacting the police and going through legal channels, even for so minor an incident. (Naturally, I apologised to the police, but they were insistent that I do something, so they talked me up to requesting an official letter of apology (as I had less than no interest in pressing charges)).

    I've reffed in rough areas, against rough teams, and heard a lot of rough things. But I've never felt in danger. And the FAs have a lot to do with that. I was being monitered in a game once, as routine training, and the monitor said 'You would have had every right to call that game off'. So I know that if it ever came to something, I can do that, and simply walk away. I have never come close (apart from on that occasion) to even considering it.

    So, the primary exaggeration in this report is 'that they have no backup'. There are a huge number of tools I have available for dealing with tricky situations. It is also an exaggeration to say that I frequently have cause to use them. This is what I'd tell a young referee. If you've had enough, you can just leave. So you can have whatever tolerance level you feel comfortable with.

    Reply

    Jay Purcell

    The problem at least in Scotland I think is that the coaches at low levels are too often in charge because of their reputation as players and of aggression rather than for their competence at developing young boys into men by teaching them admireable qualities. People want their kids to win instead of to learn and progress, the culture is just off

    Reply

    mzamo mahlangabeza

    It's been a while since I watched athletics video

    Reply

    fearinwaves

    cos the FA is corrupt AF

    Reply

    Drug Induced Fever dream

    Because who likes the referee? You'd have to pay me more than the players to deal with that shit

    Reply

    Yeasin Ahmed

    Because most of them become pundits

    Reply

    Superkh13

    As much as I'll hate on a Ref for calling something against my team, I also understand that they're just people doing their job. I don't personally hate them, I just want my team to win. I'd never incite violence against them though, that shits too far.

    Unless it's VAR.

    Reply

    C N

    The Bible originally appeared in the athletic

    Reply

    Boris Daspider

    I would expect the main reason is the abuse from parents. Some people are twats when their kids are involved.

    Reply

    monjur 1395

    Waiting for that Mourinho's spurs tactics. though it's still very early

    Reply

    tauke dabai

    you want to know why? because in modern football the stakes are too high to allow any mistake at all.

    Reply

    Ya Kelb

    Losing Referees isn't only a British problem. I'm a referee in Germany and I can tell you that we in Germany have the same problems

    Reply

    Viktoria Vasiliev

    Do you not steal anything from The Athletic anymore?

    Reply

    George Groves

    I referee and I do it because I love it. If it was for a course or for the money I can see why people quit. It does my head in but these stats show why you have to carry on

    Reply

    The Sadistic Masochist

    2:59 hide the pain ref

    Reply

    Djuret

    Brits just can’t behave. Simple as that

    Reply

    VictoriaGooner

    I have been officiating for the last 20 years here in Canada and realized that refereeing is a rewarding second career. The insults and abuse you receive from parents in youth games, and online by keyboard warriors needs to be taken more seriously by Football Associations are the world. This attacking of referees in just not in the UK but all over Europe, North.South America and Oceania. Thank you for creating the video to Matt Slater's well-written article in The Athletic. Love seeing more officiating articles in the Athletic.

    Reply

    David ambrozic

    Not a single mention about low salaries?

    Reply

    seph

    People who take sport personally are fucking pathetic wankers. Its a fucking game. A GAME. not your lifes worth you fucking sorry ass sore losers

    Reply

    Brendo G

    As the captain of amateur team, I always make an effort to shake the hands ref before and after the game and make sure no one on my team yells at the ref (not always easy).

    Refs love the game just like the players.

    Reply

    Christian Dorman

    I remember my glory days in Killer Bobs Garmanbozia Championship, shit refs tho.

    Reply

    Rory Cameron

    I volunteered to ref at U9 U8 at my team, i was 15 and faced abuse, it's not nice when a middle aged man confronts you about your skills as a ref. The kids were fine, the parents were not.

    Reply

    look at the flowers

    Because they are shit.

    Reply

    Abul Hasan

    "This story originally appeared on the Athletic"

    Reply

    BFC

    Theres a lot less than players, for some reason

    Reply

    Cameron Michael

    @ 2:32 , "I wasn't intimidated" is written as "I wasn't intimated"

    Reply

    Alex Dracu

    I'm from Romania and i was a ref when i was 16-18. I can confirm what the other guys from all over the world are saying : there's no pay, the local FAs always take the side of the clubs, threats or actual violence against refs are seen as "part of the game" in most rural places and so on.
    I was an assistant ref mostly, and in one Cup game i had a car driving up and down the sideline not more than 2 meters away from me at any point. I was flat out told they'd run me over if i don't "do a proper job". Another time there was the village cowboy (which is almost like a hobo here, nothing like the US) crack his whip close my feet the entire game, also to make sure i "do my job properly". By FIFA law there has to be police protection at any official competitive match, but i've seen more than once the local police joining the players/peasants in beating the ref. I'm talking about games with at least a couple of hundred people in the stands, not amateur league.

    Reply

    TheUKNutter

    How do I apply to be a ref in the UK? I want to ref for the premier league one day.

    Reply

    nathan gray

    0:25 I’m surprised Plymouth made it on to something

    Reply

    Morgan Bennett

    Any videos on Everton/Marco silva coming up? Some disgusting performances recently.

    Reply

    Jem Mace

    Becasue 'they' want a small corruptable pool of morons to oversee the business that's so heavily invested in.
    simple.

    Reply

    ryvr madduck

    I have been a soccer referee here in New Mexico for twelve years. The amount of abuse is fucking unacceptable.. I do not tolerate players, coaches or spectators abusing me or my assistants. I threw out a principle of one of the biggest high schools, and I was sanctioned not the principle. I have quit high school officiating I only referee amateur adult and amateur kid's games.

    Reply

    Tom Fennelly

    I qualified when I was 14 and am now a 20 year old level 4. Many times I have considered stopping refereeing altogether simply because of the lack of support from the FA, and the system setup as a whole. The fundamental problem from my experiences lie within the grassroots Sunday game. It is here, where a referee is alone with no assistants to help them that they can become targeted and subject to most abuse. Thankfully I stuck through to the point where I am now refereeing at a level that guarantees I will have assistants and most often an observer too, in a much more organised and professional setup. If the FA doesn't take more proactive steps (like sin bins which have been good) then grassroots football will fail through a fundamental lack of referees willingness.

    Reply

    Omar Sahibzada

    In the USA I love my job. It’s a good job for young people. We are super young (14 yo) and we were names best referees in the region and one of the best in groups in the US. we are abused and screamed at all the time, but we love it. Everything I’m the video is right, they are terrible to us be we love it. I work with 2000 referees right now in my club and although we take a lot of shit, we love our jobs.

    Reply

    Herpes free since 04, in jail out soon

    This was almost as boring as reading The Athletic

    Reply

    CrustyJugglers

    TL;DW Lots of footie fans are scum

    Reply

    Armahan Kar

    reffs created to curse.

    Reply

    Daniel

    IFAB2

    Reply

    Lewis Jones

    Reading through these comments is a depressing insight into how grassroots football is. Unfortunately I had similar experiences when I refereed football between 2005-2012. I was threatened by players in the changing rooms after games on several occasions in the men's leagues, as a 16/17 year old lad it was quite a difficult thing to take in. The final straw was when I had to be escorted out of an under 10's game of football as one of the parents who I had sent away from the game for screaming abuse at one of the oppositions players (a ten year old…) was waiting in the car park for me after the game. FA gave the club a small fine. What a huge deterrent…

    Reply

    Millwall Joey

    Because no one likes a grass and that’s exactly what all referees are. Grasses.

    Reply

    The Reckless Engineer

    Oh mate I am so sick of hearing about the athletic.

    Reply

    Tom Fenlon

    Was not expecting to see a ticket for little old Argo in the first scene

    Reply

    Arda Genek

    Please turkısh subtitle because we love you and we understand a little

    Reply

    Diddy1970AD

    These people that abuse the match officials are utter moron's. They are not professionals footballers their livelihoods and careers are elsewhere and turn something that should be fun and a release from the stresses of everyday life into something not worth doing. When leagues have to fold because there are no longer enough referees they be sorry.

    Reply

    lucen12

    You guys should really do a video on Markus Rosenberg and his impact on Malmö FF. His play has given the team a economic dominance in Sweden.

    Reply

    K '

    Fucking Britishers

    Reply

    Hidden Gem

    I’ve always tried to respect referees in my league as I know it’s a thankless job generally, I always give my teammates a bollocking if they show disrespect towards the refs. I know they aren’t perfect, but they’re only humans and without them there’s no game.

    Reply

    Christy Dolan

    Harden uo or fack off

    Reply

    Moses N

    Keep up the good work.
    Can you kindly do a video about "How much these referees are paid". I have seen so many poor/bad refereeing on some games and often thought that some clubs bribe them in their own favor.

    Reply

    Mod 66

    The reason is the professional players behaviour is so appalling and kids and young adults copy them in amateur and local leagues resulting in a total lack of respect for officials.

    IF THERE ARE NO REFEREES there will be not be A GAME.

    Reply

    Adrian Arshad

    To be fair, the reason referee perception is so poor is because the referees of the Premier League have been absolutely baffling on average. There was a study about their tendency to make game-making decisions against point determinants back in 2012 or 2011; I can't remember the exact date, and they short-changed many mid-table sides of points, gave Man City a 16 point advantage and … well, that pretty much says everything you need to say about that. Doesn't help that the FA keeps over-protecting these referees when they make shambolic decisions (Even arguing that bad decisions are a good thing because it gives someone something to talk about at the pub! Can you believe it?) and refuse transparency. No one wants to be a referee if those are the conditions.

    Reply

    kirigaya kazuto

    They should learn from Rugby, the Refs commands respect. There's a reason why they called Rugby is a hooligans game played by gentlemen.

    Reply

    David Glover

    The UK has CCTV everywhere but you can’t have referee body cameras? Bullshit.

    Reply

    Liam Dawber

    Refs are so biased towards the bigger teams (top 6 in the prem, Leeds, Portsmouth), this is a massive reason for fans abuse. Some of the awful favouritism I have seen up and down the football league is disgusting.

    Reply

    syteanric

    I've reffed and coached both youth and adult level.

    When i coached adults i made it patently clear, any abuse to the ref/officials would not be tolerated and the club would support the officials in EVERY instance.

    I worked with both mens and womens sides and found this worked. If a player wanted to be a cock they went to another club…not ours.

    Our reputations were phenomenal and we won fair play awards.

    When i coached the youth game i was lucky that the clubs had good systems in place to support refs. We had one incident involving one of the parents, as coach of his sons team i took him to one side.

    He wasn't expecting it from his lads own club and was a different guy from then on. Sometimes even helping set up before matches.

    Reality checks work. One thing that would go some way towards changing attitudes is ALL clubs must have a qualified ref on the books for every team they have. See how quickly attitudes change then.

    Reply

    QuietTF2

    Haven't actually watched the video yet. But the comon sense answer is that the get dogs abuse.

    Reply

    LawrenceM8

    Before YouTube was created, it originally appeared on The Athletic.

    Reply

    Vikandi Help

    Well some refs are annoying, imagine being a psg player in that barca game or a chelsea player in ucl semis 2009. Teams against Madrid where you can see clearly that you are being cheated

    Reply

    The Potato

    See. They had to wear different shirts to indicate they're under 18. It's hard to judge someone's age but FBI doesnt care.

    Reply

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *